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Law Sample Essay – Why I want to be a Lawyer

This applicant’s lively and unique approach to the “why I want to be a lawyer” essay captures the reader’s interest. Notice that the applicant discusses her religious beliefs sensitively, without proselytizing or preaching.

My interest in the law began with donuts. As a child, I developed early persuasive skills during family disagreements on how to divide boxes of the treats. My parents belonged to the “biggest people deserve the most donuts” school of thought; while as the youngest family member, I was a devout believer in the “one person, one donut” principle. The debates were often cutthroat, but when it came to donut distribution, I sought justice at any cost.

As my family grew older and more health-conscious we stopped eating donuts, and for many years I forgot our childhood debates. However, some recent life decisions have brought to mind those early explorations of justice. When I first arrived at the American International School of Rotterdam, I quickly learned that my colleagues were a diverse and talented group of people. Unsure of how to establish my own place among them, I tried phrases that had always worked to impress college friends. “When I work for the UN . . . ,” I told the second grade teacher, and she answered with an erudite discussion of the problems she faced as a consultant for that organization. “When I’m in law school . . . ,” I told the kindergarten teacher, only to hear about his own experiences in law school. By the time I discovered that even many grade-school students were better travelled than I, I learned to keep my mouth shut!

Living alone in a new country, removed from familiar personal and cultural clues to my identity and faced with these extraordinary co-workers, I started to feel meaningless. How, I wondered, could I possibly make a difference in a place as vast as our planet? To my own surprise, I found that answer at church. Although I was raised in the Bahá’í Faith, I have only recently understood the essential place that religion plays in my identity. Bahá’í social beliefs include the need to work against extreme poverty, nationalism, and prejudice; and I now realize that I cannot hold those beliefs without doing something about them. My identity rests on these convictions; I cannot see the need for help and just move on. I have to help; it’s who I am.

The lessons I’ve learned from my international colleagues have channeled my desire for service into the field of international development. I still wish to fight the “‘Biggest Get the Most’ Theory of Donut Distribution,” but now on an international scale.

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